Representations of Fundamental Chemistry Concepts in Relation to the Particulate Nature of Matter

Zübeyde Demet Kırbulut, Michael Edward Beeth
2.485 548

Abstract


This study investigated high school studentsâ understanding of fundamental chemistry concepts - states of matter, melting, evaporation, condensation, boiling, and vapor pressure, in relation to their understanding of the particulate nature of matter. A sample of six students (four females and two males) enrolled in a second year chemistry course at a midwestern high school in the USA was interviewed about their conceptions of states of matter, melting, evaporation, condensation, boiling, and vapor pressure. Interviewees were also asked to apply these concepts to explain everyday phenomena. Purposeful typical case sampling method was used to identify the students who were interviewed for this study. Evidence from these interviews indicates that multiple representations of the particulate nature of matter by students contribute to their understanding of the aforementioned fundamental concepts.

Keywords


Chemistry education, Conceptions, States of matter, Phase change, Particulate nature of matter.

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References


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How would you describe the difference between solids, liquids and gases?  Why do solids stay the same shape while liquids and gases do not?  How can you draw the picture of solids, liquids and gases in terms of the particles that make up each?  How do the motion of particles in solids, liquids and gases compare? In a room, there is an open plastic bottle half-filled with water. If this bottle were left for several days, what would happen to the level of water in the bottle?  After you wash your laundry and leave it for drying, what happens to water?  If I spill water on the ground, what happens to water when the ground dries?  When pure water in an open container at 25°C (77 °F) is left out to 10°C (50 F) for a while, what would happen to the level of water?  What is evaporation? At room temperature, there is a tightly capped plastic bottle half-filled with water. If this bottle is left for several days, you can see many tiny water droplets appear on the lid of the bottle. Where do these water droplets come from?  A bottle of liquid beverage which is cold enough is taken out of the refrigerator. When you wait for some time, you see water droplets formed on the outer surface of the bottle. What do you think where these droplets come from? How can you draw the picture of your idea for the above question in terms of the particulate nature of matter?  When you hold your hand above the boiling water, your hand gets wet. How can you explain this?  What is condensation? At a particular constant temperature, the following closed three systems contain the same type of liquid. System I have 1 L volume and contain 50 mL liquid, system II has 2L volume and contain 50 mL liquid and system III has 1 L volume and contain 25 mL volume. How can you compare the vapor pressures of these three systems?  What is vapor pressure?




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